IPAA and the CEF welcomed Wayne Poels from PM&C to talk about Best Practice Regulation. 

At the end of 2013, the Commonwealth Government estimated that there were around 85,000 Commonwealth regulations in place, costing businesses and individuals approximately $70 billion in annual compliance costs. This regulatory footprint increases if you add in the requirements of states and territories and local governments, or even the conditions that businesses place upon themselves.

Regulations protect health and safety, the environment, financial stability and are an essential part of a well-functioning society. But many of these rules have been in place for decades. And in an environment full of technical disruption and changing attitudes and behaviours, how do we know which regulations are, or continue to be ‘fit-for-purpose’? Which policies are still working?
 
Evaluation represents a key tool in helping us determine whether regulation and the policy that drives regulation are achieving appropriate outcomes.  Evaluation is inseparable from good policy design and implementation but yet – despite 30 years of trying – it is often difficult to see what evaluation activity is occurring and how it is supporting better policies and, in cases, improving the effectiveness of our regulations.
 
That’s about to change with the Minister for Indigenous Affairs just announcing $10 million over the next four years to strengthen the evaluation of Indigenous Affairs programmes. The NSW Government is attempting to put evaluation at the centre of its consideration of new policies.
 
It’s time for evaluation to be once again a topic of conversation and central in our efforts to review ‘what’s working’.

Wayne Poels
Deputy Executive Director,
Office of Best Practice Regulation, 
Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet (PM&C)

Since 2014, Wayne has overseen the development and implementation of the Australian Government’s Regulatory Reform Agenda. Prior to this, Wayne led a small team in PM&C which coordinated policy advice across Government during the Global Financial Crisis. He also worked closely with Australia's G20 Sherpa for the G20 Leaders Summit in 2008. He also worked as an analyst in the Department of Treasury. 

To view Wayne's PowerPoint presentation please click here.
 

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